Limestone

At Marble to Marvel we offer a huge range of Limestone surfaces for kitchen worktops and countertops. Limestone can also be used in a host of other applications including flooring, staircases, fireplaces and tiles bathrooms and wetrooms.

What is Limestone

Limestone is a sedimentary rock composed largely of the minerals calcite and aragonite, which are different crystal forms of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). Many limestones are composed from skeletal fragments of marine organisms such as coral or foraminifera. Limestone makes up about 10% of the total volume of all sedimentary rocks. The solubility of limestone in water and weak acid solutions leads to karst landscapes, in which water erodes the limestone over thousands to millions of years. Most cave systems are through limestone bedrock. Limestone has numerous uses: as a building material, as aggregate for the base of roads, as white pigment or filler in products such as toothpaste or paints, and as a chemical feedstock. Like most other sedimentary rocks, most limestone is composed of grains. Most grains in limestone are skeletal fragments of marine organisms such as coral or foraminifera. Other carbonate grains comprising limestones are ooids, peloids, intraclasts, and extraclasts. These organisms secrete shells made of aragonite or calcite, and leave these shells behind after the organisms die. Limestone often contains variable amounts of silica in the form of chert (chalcedony, flint, jasper, etc.) or siliceous skeletal fragment (sponge spicules, diatoms, radiolarians), and varying amounts of clay, silt and sand (terrestrial detritus) carried in by rivers. Some limestones do not consist of grains at all, and are formed completely by the chemical precipitation of calcite or aragonite, i.e. travertine. Secondary calcite may be deposited by supersaturated meteoric waters (groundwater that precipitates the material in caves). This produces speleothems, such as stalagmites and stalactites. Another form taken by calcite is oolitic limestone, which can be recognized by its granular (oolite) appearance. The primary source of the calcite in limestone is most commonly marine organisms. Some of these organisms can construct mounds of rock known as reefs, building upon past generations. Below about 3,000 meters, water pressure and temperature conditions cause the dissolution of calcite to increase nonlinearly, so limestone typically does not form in deeper waters (see lysocline). Limestones may also form in both lacustrine and evaporite depositional environments. Calcite can be either dissolved or precipitated by groundwater, depending on several factors, including the water temperature, pH, and dissolved ion concentrations. Calcite exhibits an unusual characteristic called retrograde solubility, in which it becomes less soluble in water as the temperature increases. Because of impurities, such as clay, sand, organic remains, iron oxide and other materials, many limestones exhibit different colors, especially on weathered surfaces. Limestone may be crystalline, clastic, granular, or massive, depending on the method of formation. Crystals of calcite, quartz, dolomite or barite may line small cavities in the rock. When conditions are right for precipitation, calcite forms mineral coatings that cement the existing rock grains together, or it can fill fractures. Travertine is a banded, compact variety of limestone formed along streams, particularly where there are waterfalls, and around hot or cold springs. Calcium carbonate is deposited where evaporation of the water leaves a solution supersaturated with the chemical constituents of calcite. Tufa, a porous or cellular variety of travertine, is found near waterfalls. Coquina is a poorly consolidated limestone composed of pieces of coral or shells. During regional metamorphism that occurs during the mountain building process (orogeny), limestone recrystallizes into marble. Limestone is a parent material of Mollisol soil group.

How & Where can Limestone be used?

Limestone can be used in the following applications:

    • Flooring
    • Countertops
    • Bathroom Counter Tops
    • Wall coverings
    • Vanity Tops
    • Shower Rooms
    • Staircases
    • Reception Counters
    • Sinks and Trough Basins

 

Marble 2 Marvel are the company to use….. Everyone …  Avi the owner, Vanessa, the fitters and  Ian ‘the amazing templating guy’ are extremely professional, so friendly and,most importantly, are perfectionists. We are absolutely  thrilled with our  stunning work surfaces and would,without doubt,recommend this company. We have had so many ‘wow’ comments already!! 

Liz & Mike 

 

I must say how impressed I was with your installation team. I understand it was a very complex situation and it took 5 operatives to finally get the stone in place! However it now looks fantastic and the whole kitchen has exceeded our expectations.

Mr O’Neill, Stone Cross.

 

We are very satisfied with the service and very happy with the result, we obviously made a good choice and we would certainly recommend you.

Mr Oaten, Sedlescombe.

We wish to put on record our appreciation of the way we have been served right from the initial viewing of the worktop choices through to the efficient installation and finish of the worktop that now graces our new kitchen.

Mr and Mrs Kadwill, Eastbourne.

I was really happy with the excellent service provided by Marble 2 Marvel when I recently purchased new work tops. Every detail mattered to them and because of that I am a completely satisfied customer. Many thanks to their team.

Mrs Sandaver, Hastings.

I thought I should let you know we are absolutely delighted with our new Silestone worktop. It looks spectacular and finishes our new kitchen off perfectly…

Review by Mrs Pont in Bexhil on Sea who purchased the Silestone worktop.